Deep Brain Stimulation Specialist

Center for Neurosurgery Las Vegas

Neurosurgery & Minimally Invasive and Complex Spine Neurosurgeon located in Las Vegas, NV

Deep brain stimulation can treat a variety of disabling conditions, including movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease and seizure disorders like epilepsy. Board-certified, multi-fellowship-trained neurosurgeon Scott Glickman, DO, FACOS, offers deep brain stimulation surgery at the Center for Neurosurgery Las Vegas. If you’re considering deep brain stimulation, call the office in Las Vegas, Nevada, today or request an appointment online.

Deep Brain Stimulation Q & A

What is deep brain stimulation?

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgery that implants electrodes, also called leads, in specific areas of your brain. The leads carry electrical impulses to your brain to regulate abnormal brain activity. The electrical impulses can also change chemical imbalances in your brain.

A pacemaker-like device in your upper chest controls the amount of electrical stimulation in DBS. A wire beneath your skin connects the electrodes in your brain to the device in your chest.

What does deep brain stimulation treat?

At the Center for Neurosurgery Las Vegas, Dr. Glickman performs DBS surgery to treat movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. DBS can also manage the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and epilepsy.

Research investigating DBS as a possible treatment for other conditions, including cluster headaches, dementia, and multiple sclerosis (MS), is underway.

How do I know if deep brain stimulation is right for me?

You could be a candidate for DBS if you have a movement disorder, epilepsy, or OCD and don’t get relief from conservative treatments like medications and physical therapy. If your symptoms continue and are severe enough to affect your quality of life, it could be time to consider DBS.

What should I expect from deep brain stimulation surgery?

First, Dr. Glickman conducts a thorough exam to ensure that DBS is right for you. He explains the risks and benefits of the procedure to help you make an informed decision about your health. He orders a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure to map out the areas of your brain for electrode placement.

During surgery, you could be asleep under general anesthesia or awake with a local anesthetic to numb your scalp. Your brain has no pain receptors, so you won’t experience discomfort if you remain awake.

Dr. Glickman carefully positions one or two thin leads into specific points in your brain. He attaches the leads to a wire that runs under your skin to a pulse generator implanted near your collarbone.

A few weeks later, you return to the Center for Neurosurgery Las Vegas so Dr. Glickman can activate and program the pulse generator. You can control the stimulation with a remote.

To learn more about deep brain stimulation, call the Center for Neurosurgery Las Vegas today or book an appointment online.